Reproducibility in Science and Policy – An Open Data Manchester January Special

6.30pm – 8.30pm, Tuesday 27th January 2015
Greenheys Business Centre
Manchester Science Park
Pencroft Way
Manchester M15 6JJ

Map here

Sign up on Eventbrite here

We kick off a packed 2015 Open Data Manchester calendar with an evening exploring the reasons why we need to have reproducibility when it comes to creating new knowledge. Our two guest speakers, Professor Carole Goble CBE and Ellen Broad will be our guides.

The ability to independently verify the result of scientific research has long been one of the main principles of scientific method. By creating reproducible research – through publishing the methods, code and data along with the scientific paper – others can reproduce the results and create new work from this research. Although this might seem an essential position to take for the creation of better science it is not universally implemented.

Reproducibility in policy is an emerging area. Like science it would seem to be an essential component for making good policy decisions that can then be tried and tested by others. Allowing scrutiny of the methods and underlying data used to make a policy decision has the possibility of creating a more informed electorate and an environment for building on robust evidence based policy decisions.


Biographies

Carole Goble is a Full Professor in the School of Computer Science, at the University of Manchester in the UK. She leads a large team of researchers and developers working in e-Science. She applies technical advances in knowledge technologies, distributed computing, workflows and social computing to solve information management problems for Life Scientists, especially Systems Biology, and other scientific disciplines, including Biodiversity, Chemistry, Health informatics and Astronomy. Her current research interests are in reproducible research, asset curation and preservation, semantic interoperability, knowledge exchange between scientists and new models of scholarly communication. She has been advocating the releasing of research as Research Objects (www.researchobject.org).

In 2008 she was awarded the Microsoft Jim Gray award for outstanding contributions to e-Science and in 2010 was elected a Fellow of the Royal Academy of Engineering. In 2014 she was appointed Commander of the Order of the British Empire by Her Majesty The Queen for her Services to Science.

Ellen joined the ODI in September 2014 as Policy Lead, where her role is to provides advice to government and the private sector on how it can capitalise on open data, and engage on issues affecting access to and re-use of data. 

Ellen’s background is in copyright law and policy, focused on its intersection with and impact on internet services and new technologies. Ellen started in this area as Executive Director of the Australian Digital Alliance (ADA) before moving to a role as Manager of Digital Policy & Projects for the International Federation of Library Associations & Institutions (IFLA) based in The Hague. Ellen will totally nerd out on arcane details of EU and international copyright law if given an opening (so think carefully about looking too interested).

Outside of copyright and data, Ellen plays drums (badly), reads books and longs for Australian sunshine.