Open Data Manchester – April Edition

6.30pm – 8.30pm Tuesday 29th April 2014
Greenheys Business Centre
Manchester Science Park
Pencroft Way
Manchester M15 6JJ
Map here

The past few months have been fairly hectic as open data in Manchester is concerned. We have had special focusses on transport, linked data, as well as Code Fellow programmes and competitions.

This month is an open forum and will be an opportunity to find out what projects people are involved with, what opportunities are available and a chance to generally plot, scheme and converse.

We will also be showcasing the results from last month’s GMDSP Coding Challenge

Follow us on Twitter for the latest announcements @opendatamcr

Open Data Manchester March Edition – GMDSP Data Dive

6.30 – 8.30pm, Monday 24th March 2014

Tech Hub Manchester
3rd Floor
Carver’s Warehouse
77 Dale Sreet
Manchester
M1 2HG
Map here

This March’s Open Data Manchester is a special event held in partnership with our friends at FutureEverything. Since September they have been working on the Greater Manchester Data Synchronisation Programme (GMDSP) – a groundbreaking open data initiative that forges links between the code community and local authorities. GMDSP works with the 10 Greater Manchester local authorities to release corresponding datasets as linked open data. This has been done by placing coders (Code Fellows) many from the Open Data Manchester community, in the local authorities to help identify and transform data.

GMDSP_Logo_Full_text

The Data Dive is a chance to see and understand the work being done, talk to the teams releasing the data and more importantly get a heads up regarding the challenges that will be set for the GMDSP Coding Challenge taking place as part of FutureEverything on the weekend of 29th and 30th March.

Sign up for the Data Dive Here

Refreshments will be provided

GMDSP is a partnership between FutureEverything, Connected Digital Economy and Future Cities Catapults working with Manchester City, Salford City and Trafford Metropolitan Borough Councils

Open Data Manchester – Transport Special

6.30pm – 9pm Tuesday 25th February 2014
Greenheys Business Centre
Manchester Science Park
Pencroft Way
Manchester M15 6JJ
Map here

An efficient transportation system that allows people to move around easily for work and leisure is an essential part of today’s modern city. Being able to make decisions on how we travel based on convenience, cost and accessibility especially if information is updated in real time, should allow a more enlightened traveling public.

Open data offers a chance to create a more intelligent environment for making travel decisions. Traditionally the data needed to create applications and services to enable these decisions would be closed due to restrictive licensing, technological difficulties or confused policy decisions, but this is starting to change.

This month’s edition of Open Data Manchester brings together a host of transport based open data initiatives.

Transport for Greater Manchester (TfGM) will be deliver an update as to the progress that they are making with open data now that the Local Sustainable Transport Fund and the DRNETIS (Dynamic Road Network Efficiency and Travel Informaton System) deployment.
C3 and DRNETIS Diagram

Rockshore who’ve created the Network Rail APIs will talk about the progress and uptake of these and answer questions regarding their use.

FutureEverything – Will talk about a new set of APIs that allow people to access up to data scheduling, arrivals and departure information and other related data from their CitySDK programme

The people from ThoughtWorks will talk about their journey planner for Manchester’s trams Tramchester an insight into how they created using graph data bases can be found here

There will also be an opportunity to look at the new Highways Agency NTIS real time services.

So if you are transportista developing the next generation of transport services, data wrangler trying to understand the complexities of our transit system or just someone who would like to get from A to B that little bit easier, this edition is for you.

As always there will be opportunity to present projects, ask questions and network.

We advise people to book through the Eventbrite link here

CitySDK Short Horizontal EUThis event is partially funded under the ICT Policy Support Programme (ICT PSP) as part of the Competitiveness and Innovation Framework Programme by the European Community.

Open Data Manchester – Bringing in 2014

Happy New Year everyone,

There is a last minute change of venue for January’s Open Data Manchester. The event was originally advertised as being at Tech Hub Manchester but due to incompetence on our part, the room that we booked was unsuitable. Step in the lovely people from Manchester Science Park who saw our plight and offered us the Atrium in the Greenheys Centre on Manchester Science Park. Map here

Although this month’s meeting was supposed to be a fairly informal affair, 2014 brings quite a few opportunities for developers, visualisers, data wranglers and other people who like to dig into data.

We will have the latest news on some of the open data projects that are ongoing. With the announcement of some new commissions for visualisers and developers and a couple of new hack events that will be coming up.

As always Open Data Manchester is an open forum and if you want to add something, just let us know, ODM is open and for everyone.

Follow us on Twitter : @opendatamcr

Topics
New opportunities for data visualisers
Data hacking
GMDSP Code Fellow Programme
and much more.

Open Data Manchester – January 2014 edition
18:30 – 20:30, January 28th 2014
The Greenheys Centre
Manchester Science Park
Pencroft Way
Manchester
M15 6JJ

Dates for the diary
Open Data Manchester Transport Special – Tuesday 25th February
Open Data Manchester Cooperatives Special – Tuesday 25th March

Open Data Manchester – October Edition

Hackers, activists, artists, journalists and public sector employees unite once again for Manchester’s regular open data meetup.

We’ll be down at Madlab on the last Tuesday of the month (29/10/13) for another delicious dose of open data goodness.

You can find calendar links and a map etc on the Eventbrite listing.

As ever, we will be delighted to hear about any projects you’d like to share or to discuss any questions you’d like to pose.

Afsnit I – Got a good idea using data?

Image

Afsniti is a yearly Innovation Competition that takes place at the end of November in Hørsholm Hospital. If you are a creative entrepreneur, artist or innovator or have a really good idea they would like to hear from you. There is a top prize of 100,000 DKR and if you are one of the 20-24 projects chosen you will be invited over to Denmark to take part in the Afsnit I Camp and Festival. Accommodation and food is provided with the possibility of support for travel too.

Open Data Manchester – September Edition

Open Environmental Data Special.

Tuesday 24th September 2013

Madlab 36-40 Edge Street Manchester M4 1HN

Sign up here: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/event/8260221545

There has been a lot of emphasis in the open data movement on access to data that shines a light on the workings of government or allows the creation of mobility applications. Data that gives us insight into the environment in which we live, work and play tends to be little used yet offers huge potential in enabling people to understand and act on local environmental issues.

The Freedom of Information Act giving people the right to data that public bodies hold is well known but there is little understanding of legislation that gives people the right to access environmental data. The Environmental Information Regulations give people the power to ask for data on a host of environmental issues, yet unlike their FOIA cousins are under-utilised. Is it that EIR is too complex and little understood or is it that the data that is held is incomplete or difficult to use?

In mitigation of this there is a growing army of people who are taking matters into their own hands be exploring, mapping and creating environmental data that is more relevant to their communities. Low cost ‘easy to use’ sensors can be deployed , networked, fitted to smart phones and the data aggregated to provide a more comprehensive picture of our environment.

This months Open Data Manchester is a chance to look at some of the initiatives that have been taking place recently. It will be an opportunity to discuss why we need access to environmental data and how people can come together to map their own communities.

Growing Data

**The following guest post is by Farida Vis from the Everyday Growing Cultures research project. The project looks at the potentially transformative effect of bringing together the food growing and open data communities.**

This post also originally appeared on the OKFN Blog http://blog.okfn.org/2013/07/18/the-transformative-potential-of-gardening-with-data/

EGC picture_OKFN blog post

Those supporting the government’s open data agenda highlight the business case for open data, an economic argument about its moneysaving potential, along with the suggestion that it will lead to better-informed citizens. All of these claims require close and critical examination. If money is saved, who benefits and makes money from these innovations? How exactly do citizens know about and become better informed through open data? Why should they care? Some within the wide and heterogeneous open data ‘movement’ subsequently point to the importance of ‘really useful’ data, suggesting citizens might care and become better informed if open data was seen as useful in their daily lives.

Our project, (http://everydaygrowingcultures.org/), addresses these issues by focusing on two distinct yet connected communities: allotment, growing communities (plot holders; allotment societies; those waiting for plots; allotment governing bodies) and the open data community (open data activists; developers; local government; data journalists). Allotment and open data communities may initially seem unconnected, but they share many concerns: around ideas of knowledge sharing, exchange, collaboration, ‘the commons’, and access to shared resources (digital and land).

We believe there is a potentially transformative value in connecting these two currently disparate communities. Bringing them together could build stronger, more active communities, benefit local economies and improve environmental sustainability and food security. We focus on the current allotment waiting list crisis and huge interest in growing your own, to investigate the value that could be brought into people’s lives through opening up local government data on allotments. Moreover, we are interested in facilitating citizen-led solutions to this crisis by identifying and mapping vacant land for the purpose of growing food.

Our research is based on the UK cities of Sheffield and Manchester, which both have thriving open data and food growing communities. Keeping in mind the different aspects of the open data agenda – the economic dimension, its claimed contribution to a better informed citizenry – along with the methods through which open data is practiced, we are using the allotment case and increased interest in food growing to ask:

* What does digital engagement and transformation look like within these communities?

* How can these communities further the national open data agenda so that it benefits citizens?

* How can a more widely adopted and enacted open data strategy benefit local economies?

* If unsuccessful in these aspects, what might open data’s unintended consequences look like?

* How can we think of forms of resistance, mobilisation of local histories and heritage identities?

* How can we rethink received ideas of participation and enacting citizenship in light of these?

Since mid-February 2013, in partnership with Open Data Manchester, The Kindling Trust and Grow Sheffield, we have run a number of events with growing communities in Manchester and Sheffield, to identify potential food growing spaces. We have talked to local councils about taking some of our ideas forward and how this might take place. We have requested allotment data through the Freedom of Information Act and looked at how council websites provide information to potential allotment plot holders. We are in the process of surveying people on waiting lists and have made a documentary film highlighting these important issues.

Join the Everyday Growing Cultures team in Sheffield on 23 July to discuss and explore these issues with key partners and stakeholders, including leading UK allotment expert Professor David Crouch. As part of the event, the award winning feature documentary, Grown in Detroit, will be screened. Before that our own project documentary film will be shown and the filmmakers (Erinma Ochu and Caroline Ward) will be there to answer your questions!

The event is free to attend, but registration is required. Please register here: (http://everydaygrowingculturespublicevent.eventbrite.co.uk/). Please check the website for further details.

We will also present work from the project at these upcoming events: (http://smarttowns.co.uk/) event in Halifax in September.

(http://www.digthecity.co.uk/) film screening at Dig the City festival in Manchester (3-11 August).

Open Data Manchester – By Jove it’s June.

6.30pm – 8.30pm Tuesday 25th June 2013
MadLab – 36 – 40 Edge Street Manchester M4 1HN

Manchester’s premiere open data meetup will be taking place once more this month.

Open Data Manchester has been meeting regularly since the beginning of 2010 and is a free and open forum for discussion and practice around open data.

It is a chance to catch up on all stuff ‘open data’ that is taking place both locally and beyond. There are a number of initiatives around and it would be good to catch hold of them.

If you have any projects or ideas you want to discuss or have an open data itch that you need to scratch, feel free to bring them along.

 

Open Data Manchester – May Edition

Tuesday 28th May

6.30 -8.30pm

MadLab, 36 – 40 Edge Street, Manchester M4 1HN

Sign up on Eventbrite here

As well as the usual opportunity to show people what we’ve all been up to, this month is a chance to catch up with other open data developments within Greater Manchester.

DataGM is due to be relaunched after a long development hiatus. When launched it will be an instance of the latest CKAN. One of the Trafford open data team will be here to talk it through and how you can get involved in the new fresh DataGM. For those that want a sneak preview you can find it here. NB this only has a few test datasets on it: http://datagm2.ckanhosted.com/

For the classic DataGM experience you can find it here: http://www.datagm.org.uk

We will get an update from Farida Vis and Steven Flower as to the first outings of the mapping for food growing walks that aim to uncover unused green space that could be used for growing food. This month saw two expeditions in Trafford. Further information can be found on the  Everyday Growing Cultures project website http://everydaygrowingcultures.org/

The Shakespeare Review was released last week https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/198752/13-744-shakespeare-review-of-public-sector-information.pdf
The review explores the growth opportunities of, and how to widen access to, the wealth of information held by the public sector. We will look at the recommendations that it makes to Government

For those that were around for the Innovation Challenge in March you will be aware of the development of CitySDK API. The logic behind it’s development is that it uses Open Street Map as a base layer in which other data is mapped over it. As it is being implemented by a number of European Cities it should theoretically make it easier to port applications across them thus increasing market. We should have the final specification.

There will also be an update on funding out there for your projects open data and otherwise.

If you have anything that you want to add just let us know, ODM is open and for everyone.

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