Joy Diversion III

Saturday 1st September, 11.00 – 17.00
Federation House
Federation Street
Manchester M4 4BF

Book here.

After the success of the first two Joy Diversions, we’re running a third day on Saturday 1st September.

Often viewed as a functional place of work, retail and leisure, our city centre bounded by Trinity Way, Great Ancoats Street and the Mancunian Way is imbued with history, iniquity, celebration and endeavour. Let us go out and find what’s out there, discover the forgotten spaces, create stories and map our city.

Starting with maps of the city from over 150 years ago, we will propose expeditions to uncharted territories, revisits to previously explored places, strange meanderings and any other diversions that people fancy.

You can see a taster of what happened on the last Joy Diversion here.

 

Joy Diversion

Saturday 19th May 12.00 – 17.00
Federation House
Manchester M4 4BF and then wherever

Register here

Calling all ramblers, explorers and meanderers. Surveyors, cartographers and inquisitors – people who look up to the rooftops and down into the culverts. Join us for an afternoon of mapping, exploring and wandering in Central Manchester and Salford.

Often viewed as a functional place of work, retail and leisure, our city centre bounded by Trinity Way, Great Ancoats Street and the Mancunian Way is imbued with history, iniquity, celebration and endeavour. Let us go out and find what’s out there, discover the forgotten spaces, create stories and map our city.

As well as exploring, we will also introduce you to mapping with OpenStreetMap; the people-powered map of the world.

We will propose expeditions to uncharted territories, revisits to previously explored places, strange meanderings and any other diversions that people fancy.

Adventurers will be split into parties and encouraged to map, photograph, document and bring back their findings to share with everyone.

If people want to delve deeper there should be an opportunity to do further research on the places discovered.

You will need:

Yourself
Comfortable walking shoes or what ever you need to get around
Weather appropriate clothing (hopefully sun cream rather than waterproofs!)
A phone: with a camera would be advantageous

The event is open to all, although minors need to be accompanied.

In addition to this event, the day will also include a short annual general meeting of the OSM UK community interest company. For more information on the AGM and to register click here

If you would like to help out on the day, let us know by email hello[a]opendatamanchester[.]org[.]uk or contact us on Twitter @opendatamcr

Open Infrastructure Night – Open Data and Open IoT

Monday February 1st, 6.30 – 8.30pm
The Manchester Escalator
231 Deansgate
Manchester
M3 4EN

Sign up here

If you believe some of the tech press 2016 is the year that the Internet of Things will take over – billions of devices will become connected and our lives will be free from the drudgery of turning things on and off again. Beyond the hype IoT is connected sensors, actuators and machines that can be communicate over a data infrastructure. Like the internet, the data infrastructure is a critical component which is generally owned and operated by large telecommunication providers. Things Manchester is part of The Things Network founded in Amsterdam and aims to create a crowdsourced, open and free IoT data infrastructure for Greater Manchester and beyond.

Things Manchester will introduce the project and how you can get involved.

The last few months have seen unprecedented rainfall across the north of the UK. Lancashire, Yorkshire and Cumbria bore the brunt of the flooding with bridges swept away, town centres flooded and buildings inundated. ODI Leeds is running a Flood Hack event that will encourage the development of new ideas around flood warnings and prevention. Having access to open data and an open IoT infrastructure is key to this development. The team who are developing Flood Hack will introduce the event and what can be expected and how you can participate

Open Data Manchester – November 2012 Edition

6.30pm – 8.30pm Tuesday 27th November 2012
MadLab – 36 – 40 Edge Street Manchester M4 1HN

Sign up using Eventbrite

The next Open Data Manchester should be a good one. Hot off the back of the Manchester Hackathon we will be showcasing some of the things developed from some of the participants and having a bit of a debrief. Overall the feedback has been really positive but it would be good to see what could be improved.

As part of the Hackathon there were a number of datasets released by Salford, Trafford and most impressively by Manchester City Council. Some of the data released is a first for a local authority and some of it is quite contentious so worth a look.

Open Data Manchester will be hosting a delegation from Brazil who are on a technical visit to the UK to find out more about the open data, transparency and accountability, and Freedom of Information.

Finally if you are interested in how applicaitons develop during a hackathon, John Rees took a screenshot every 30 seconds whilst building his multi prize winning SATLAV application

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JZcUEXJ0MhY]


Open Data Manchester is partially funded under the ICT Policy Support Programme (ICT PSP) as part of the Competitiveness and Innovation Framework Programme by the European Community.

The Manchester Hackathon not bad for No.1

For those of you who missed it, the first Manchester Hackathon occurred last weekend. Manchester City Council, FutureEverything and ourselves came together to create 24 hours of coding deliciousness.

The hackathon was part of Manchester City Council’s commitment to open data and was the motivation for the release of datasets, APIs and documentation for the event. Data can be found here on the MDDA website The variety of data available ranges from trees which is all the more pertinent as Ash Dieback spreads through the country, Contact Centre data and Contaminated Land which is a hugely contentious dataset. A lot of the data released was in consultation with the Open Data Manchester community.

The format of the Hackathon created an intense atmosphere in MadLab as 45 coders and designers strove to create something demonstrable by the 5pm deadline. In the end 16 teams presented their creations in two minute quick fire presentations.

The winners were:

Best Under 21’s Creation – £600 – Bus Tracker by 19 year old MMU student Bilawal Hameed, the Bus Tracker app will let you find the nearest bus stop to you, direct you to it and give you the times and destinations of the next bus due.

Best Visualisation and Developers Prize (voted for by everyone taking part in the Hackathon)- £600 for each prize, was won John Rees for his app called Sat Lav. If you are caught short in the City, you just open the app and it will direct to nearest public toilet including those in shops and bars which allow the public to use.

Best Locative Application, the £600 prize was won by Matt Schofield for his Taxi Rank Finder app. Matt’s app shows the nearest taxi rank to you and directs you to it. It also shows if it is a marshalled rank and its opening times.

Best Solution for an Identified Problem (£600 prize) was won by Slawomir Wdowka and Imran Younis for their Manchester Voice which would allow the public to submit ideas to the council, then checks records to see if other people have made the same suggestion. When an idea is developed it would allow the public to vote on it.

The grand prize of £1,000 + £3,600 in development funding was won by Data Crossfader, created by James Rutherford and Ashley Herriott, a visualisation tool that plots information on a map of Manchester to allow people to compare important sets of data. For example, using postcode details it shows the locations of road traffic incidents on a map, and then adds where speed cameras are, so if they is a particular area where accidents happen which are not covered by a camera, it easily shows that on a map.

By the end of the event a number of developers had been approached to develop their ideas further and we’ll try and keep track of where that gets to.

For a much more in depth post by James Rutherford click here